Christianity, Devotionals, The Writing Life

Creativity and the Incarnation

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I feel happy and fulfilled when I do anything creative. I can feel depressed and useless when I ignore an urge to create. I believe, since we are made in the image of the great Creator, there is something in our Spiritual DNA that desires to create — a story, a painting, a song, a flowerbed, a delicious dinner. God works in us “both to will and do of His good pleasure.”

When I’m writing my novel, St. Anne’s, I feel fully myself. I know that nobody else can create the story I am writing. My unique fingerprint is on the work. It may be imperfect, but God will grow me through my obedience to His promptings. Sometimes words flow without effort. Upon re-reading a passage, I have thought, “Where did that come from?” When God’s in control, I write better than I know how to write.

I think all true creativity is incarnational, requiring only a willing vessel  for God to use. The Father called the virgin Mary to  be willing to create His only begotten Son. She agreed to  the angel’s news with the words, “Behold the handmaid of the LORD: be it unto me according to thy word.”

The LORD is the Prime Creator, the only One who creates something out of nothing. When we humans create, we must use materials that God has already made.

  • God created color and the mathematics of perspective and line before the first person painted a picture.
  • God created music before the first human was led to build an instrument to demonstrate the melodies God put in his heart.
  • God created words at the very beginning. He is the Master storyteller.
  • God wants his children to allow Him to create beauty through them. True art.

[There is also false art,  thrown together golden calves that are still worshiped by godless people. A lot of it is “modern” so-called art reflecting the chaos of a godless mind. It speaks only to people whose minds are also godless and in chaos. It is created with a motive of self-glorification and the fulfilling of fleshly lusts. There is chaotic music and pornographic writing — God’s gift of creativity gone wretchedly wrong.]

The most beautiful art that survives to this day seems to have been created by Christ-followers. I believe God painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel through the agency of Michelangelo.

I believe God used the pen of this artist to remind us of His love for us sheep.

Shepherd & Lamb

Who doubts that God used Handel to write the Hallelujah Chorus?

When you were a child, did you ever want to paint, write songs, or books? God creates those desires in us because He wills us to birth something that honors Him. Why do we let those impulses wither on the vine? Fear of failure? Fear of success? Fear of man? Fear? Remember, “God hath not given us the spirit of fear.”

So, I encourage you to rebuke the whisperer of doubt and fear. Pray and begin. Take the first step of faith. Then another. As you take the first step, God will move. He will honor your faith step and empower you to do what He gives you the desire to do. Every creative person you have ever heard of — Beethoven, Rembrandt, C.S. Lewis–started out as a beginner, taking those first wobbly steps by faith.

God delights to take ordinary people of low estate and create through them. It is because we are ordinary that He receives glory. Take courage from the angel Gabriel’s announcement to Mary about the incarnation of Jesus. “For with God nothing shall be impossible.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “Creativity and the Incarnation”

  1. Really good post. I too, can relate to what you are saying about writing. If God is leading me, my writing is so much better than trying to dig something out from inside of me. I love it when it flows from Him! So hope you are doing well! Best Wishes! ❤❤❤❤

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